Thursday, July 31, 2008

The Sheer Idea of Dating is Exhausting

I promised myself I'd give this whole meeting men thing the ol' college try, but I've even found the minimal effort in the last 2 weeks exhausting. I've so far only done Craigslist...and here are the stats:


Post 1


4    responses


1     that were potentially interesting


0     responses back after photo sent


0     dates


Post 2


9    responses


5    that were potentially interesting


2    responses after photo sent


0    dates


One of the 2 responses from Post 2 is a guy in "his forties." Honestly, I'm not up for that considering how I hate getting older myself. Plus, I asked him for his age because I "didn't want to be dating my dad." (Yes that's what I said.) Don't give me a decade. 40, maybe. 48, we have serious issues.


So, I soldier on. I may have a date with the guy obsessed with the 80s, which I'm trying to remain upbeat about. I revised my Match.com profile yesterday...and as per usual, I have guys who are ignoring my actual profile which states what I'm looking for. Has it always been this hard to meet people? I mean, really.


 

Monday, July 28, 2008

Commuter Sentences, Special Edition: or, Further Reasons Why Taxis in DC Suck

316603519_a45d452a74


Okay, since taxis in DC moved to a metered fare system, they don't suck AS MUCH as they used to, but that doesn't make them NOT suck. Witness tonight. Ted organized a small army of people to go to the showing of Arsenic and Old Lace (love it!) at Screen on the Green. I insisted on taking a cab home, because after hearing about my neighbor's break-in and other crimes in my area, it wasn't worth it. Though Ted was going to walk, he figured what the hay, since we LIVE FIVE BLOCKS from each other. Keep that in mind. Five blocks. Barely. So, anyway, we get in the cab, and the driver says something I don't understand. All I knew was that it was something that meant we were going to be paying too much.


For those of you not from DC, let me explain. In normal cities, you get in a cab, the driver sets the meter, and then you get out and pay what's on the meter. You could drive with five people and each go to a different place and at the end of the ride, the fare is paid. Not so in DC. For the longest time, DC had a zone system. In the zone system, you could pay as much as twice as much if you were one block out of a zone. It was crazy. To go 1 mile from Union Station to my house, it would cost $10. The drivers bitched and moaned that everyone except them wanted a meter system. This was because people thought they couldn't be cheated if there were meters. Not so.


In the old system, Ted and I shared a cab once. We ended up EACH spending $20, which we didn't find out until Ted had already been dropped off. 


$3.00 initial fee + $1.00 fuel surcharge + $1.50 passenger fee=$5.50 + fare


The driver informed us he'd "save us" by resetting the meter because normally he would have to charge Ted the full fare and then charge me another additional full fare. WHAT? What is this, an airline? Why, then, wouldn't we get separate cabs? What savings is there in sharing? Whatever...so, when Ted got out, he paid $8.75...actually, I think he gave him $10.


Next, the meter's reset: $3.00 initial fee + $1.00 surcharge=$4.00+ fare


The dude drives me (slowly...by the way) the five blocks, which the cheapskate in me for a moment considered walking until I imagined being held up, and I get out and pay $5.00. That's $15 to go a little over a mile. Though scarier, it would have been cheaper to have been mugged. (Or, for that matter, to have driven into work).


This great taxi photo with a pre-meter rant can be found by Wayan Vota on Flickr.

Commuter Sentences, Special Edition: or, Further Reasons Why Taxis in DC Suck

316603519_a45d452a74


Okay, since taxis in DC moved to a metered fare system, they don't suck AS MUCH as they used to, but that doesn't make them NOT suck. Witness tonight. Ted organized a small army of people to go to the showing of Arsenic and Old Lace (love it!) at Screen on the Green. I insisted on taking a cab home, because after hearing about my neighbor's break-in and other crimes in my area, it wasn't worth it. Though Ted was going to walk, he figured what the hay, since we LIVE FIVE BLOCKS from each other. Keep that in mind. Five blocks. Barely. So, anyway, we get in the cab, and the driver says something I don't understand. All I knew was that it was something that meant we were going to be paying too much.


For those of you not from DC, let me explain. In normal cities, you get in a cab, the driver sets the meter, and then you get out and pay what's on the meter. You could drive with five people and each go to a different place and at the end of the ride, the fare is paid. Not so in DC. For the longest time, DC had a zone system. In the zone system, you could pay as much as twice as much if you were one block out of a zone. It was crazy. To go 1 mile from Union Station to my house, it would cost $10. The drivers bitched and moaned that everyone except them wanted a meter system. This was because people thought they couldn't be cheated if there were meters. Not so.


In the old system, Ted and I shared a cab once. We ended up EACH spending $20, which we didn't find out until Ted had already been dropped off. 


$3.00 initial fee + $1.00 fuel surcharge + $1.50 passenger fee=$5.50 + fare


The driver informed us he'd "save us" by resetting the meter because normally he would have to charge Ted the full fare and then charge me another additional full fare. WHAT? What is this, an airline? Why, then, wouldn't we get separate cabs? What savings is there in sharing? Whatever...so, when Ted got out, he paid $8.75...actually, I think he gave him $10.


Next, the meter's reset: $3.00 initial fee + $1.00 surcharge=$4.00+ fare


The dude drives me (slowly...by the way) the five blocks, which the cheapskate in me for a moment considered walking until I imagined being held up, and I get out and pay $5.00. That's $15 to go a little over a mile. Though scarier, it would have been cheaper to have been mugged. (Or, for that matter, to have driven into work).


This great taxi photo with a pre-meter rant can be found by Wayan Vota on Flickr.

Thursday, July 24, 2008

In Which I Have Fun With My Mom...

It's not often that a hurricane comes along with your mom's name. I rolled my eyes at my dad and brother's jokes about it before it hit, but I have to admit that it's pretty funny reading the headlines when they leave the "hurricane" part out:


Dolly’s Impact on Gulf of Mexico Oil


Dolly Destroys Texas Cotton, Sorghum Crops


Dolly Weakens to Depression Over Texas

Bush Declares Disaster in Texas After Dolly


Twister Spawned by Dolly Over San Antonio



Dolly Blows, Levees Hold Despite Rain


 

 


Hee hee hee. Love ya, Mom.

In Which I Have Fun With My Mom...

It's not often that a hurricane comes along with your mom's name. I rolled my eyes at my dad and brother's jokes about it before it hit, but I have to admit that it's pretty funny reading the headlines when they leave the "hurricane" part out:


Dolly’s Impact on Gulf of Mexico Oil


Dolly Destroys Texas Cotton, Sorghum Crops


Dolly Weakens to Depression Over Texas

Bush Declares Disaster in Texas After Dolly


Twister Spawned by Dolly Over San Antonio



Dolly Blows, Levees Hold Despite Rain


 

 


Hee hee hee. Love ya, Mom.

Tuesday, July 22, 2008

Thank You for Being a Friend!

Estelle-Getty-profile


I was devastated to learn on Facebook that Estelle Getty died today at age 84 (seriously--that's usually the kind of news I get from Yahoo news). I am a huge Golden Girls fan (and, so, incidentally, is my gay downstairs neighbor of the loud TV). Estelle, you brought joy to the lives of many! You will be missed!


Image from Buddy TV.

Monday, July 21, 2008

Could This Help Transit?

Img_23949


I got a lot of enjoyment out of this articlefrom the Miami Herald, via Planetizen. Here's a snippet:


"James Harris loves public buses so much, he stole one from a Miami-Dade depot last month and, wearing a genuine uniform, chauffeured unsuspecting fare-paying passengers around South Beach for hours, police and government officials said Thursday.


When Harris, 18, was arrested a few days later, he posted bail -- and promptly stole a second bus.


''He's a real transit freak,'' said Derrick Gordon, assistant director for bus operations..."


Photo from nycsubway.org--their 2001 Best Non-NYC Metro Area Bus Photo contest winner BusProwler, depicting "bus 9910, a Miami-Dade Transit 1999 NABI 40-LFW is parked outside a trailer park in Liberty City assisting in evacuating a flooded trailer park following the infamous No Name Storm of October 2000."


 

Could This Help Transit?

Img_23949


I got a lot of enjoyment out of this articlefrom the Miami Herald, via Planetizen. Here's a snippet:


"James Harris loves public buses so much, he stole one from a Miami-Dade depot last month and, wearing a genuine uniform, chauffeured unsuspecting fare-paying passengers around South Beach for hours, police and government officials said Thursday.


When Harris, 18, was arrested a few days later, he posted bail -- and promptly stole a second bus.


''He's a real transit freak,'' said Derrick Gordon, assistant director for bus operations..."


Photo from nycsubway.org--their 2001 Best Non-NYC Metro Area Bus Photo contest winner BusProwler, depicting "bus 9910, a Miami-Dade Transit 1999 NABI 40-LFW is parked outside a trailer park in Liberty City assisting in evacuating a flooded trailer park following the infamous No Name Storm of October 2000."


 

Wednesday, July 16, 2008

Poetry Palisades Week 2--Signature Ride

800px-Fountain-pen-nib


As part of Word World, this is my entry on my Park's Signature Ride (Week 2...working on Week 3). I must admit, I have not gone to many, if any, theme parks, so this is taking extra creativity!


Signature Poetry Palisades Ride:  Inspired Highs and Depths of Despair. This ride is geared toward giving visitors the feeling of being a writer. First, riders are each given berets and then strapped in to a very hard chair-shaped vehicle. The riders quickly ascend a hill as high as a mountain and feel as if they are on top of the world. This exhilarating feeling continues as they plummet down the next several hills. It's as if the feeling will never end. However, it does abruptly at the end of the fourth hill. At this point, the ride slows down and continues on a flat surface and the riders are put into complete sensory deprivation while they smack their heads against the table-like ledge in front of them. They are told that the only way they can continue on the ride is if they write 4 pages of extremely creative material. They are given lots of other poetry to look at, but this serves only to remind them that they have not a creative hair on their head and that they'll never complete these four pages--never! They are then placed around cafe tables with other riders, where they proceed to drink espresso and complain about their lack of ability to continue. As abruptly as the ride stops, it speeds up again, much to the surprise of the riders. This time, they know what to expect and aren't quite as thrilled as the first time with the highs, waiting for the proverbial shoe to drop. Visitors end up at one of several different endings: Your poetry's crap and you will die in oblivion; You aren't favored now, but you'll be discovered after your untimely death; and "You're famous! Wait, are you sure you're writing poetry?"


Fountain nib photo from Wikimedia.

Poetry Palisades Week 2--Signature Ride

800px-Fountain-pen-nib


As part of Word World, this is my entry on my Park's Signature Ride (Week 2...working on Week 3). I must admit, I have not gone to many, if any, theme parks, so this is taking extra creativity!


Signature Poetry Palisades Ride:  Inspired Highs and Depths of Despair. This ride is geared toward giving visitors the feeling of being a writer. First, riders are each given berets and then strapped in to a very hard chair-shaped vehicle. The riders quickly ascend a hill as high as a mountain and feel as if they are on top of the world. This exhilarating feeling continues as they plummet down the next several hills. It's as if the feeling will never end. However, it does abruptly at the end of the fourth hill. At this point, the ride slows down and continues on a flat surface and the riders are put into complete sensory deprivation while they smack their heads against the table-like ledge in front of them. They are told that the only way they can continue on the ride is if they write 4 pages of extremely creative material. They are given lots of other poetry to look at, but this serves only to remind them that they have not a creative hair on their head and that they'll never complete these four pages--never! They are then placed around cafe tables with other riders, where they proceed to drink espresso and complain about their lack of ability to continue. As abruptly as the ride stops, it speeds up again, much to the surprise of the riders. This time, they know what to expect and aren't quite as thrilled as the first time with the highs, waiting for the proverbial shoe to drop. Visitors end up at one of several different endings: Your poetry's crap and you will die in oblivion; You aren't favored now, but you'll be discovered after your untimely death; and "You're famous! Wait, are you sure you're writing poetry?"


Fountain nib photo from Wikimedia.

Tuesday, July 15, 2008

No, I'm not in Hawaii

Image002


My friend Emily is...for WORK. How is it that I end up going to places like Richmond? (Not hating on Richmond...it's just, well, NOT Hawaii). I LOVE this picture of hers. She has some other awesome photos you can check out on Flickr.

Monday, July 14, 2008

Mondays are Pointless

Images


Just stating the obvious here. We have a 9:30ish meeting which somehow seemed to not start until 10ish and then had a meeting at 11...and now it's lunch. What is the point? At least our windows have been cleaned today. Shiny shiny.


Also, is it a sign of mental defect or naivete that I don't understand the hullabaloo around Bernie Mac's joke at at Obama rally. I just don't understand it. I'm guessing I haven't actually heard the actual joke. Please explain if you understand.


That's all...I started working on my rides for Word World yesterday...it's proving difficult.

Sunday, July 13, 2008

Mysteries of Man Meeting Exposed

Datinggm


So, I have recently come to the realization that at the current pace I'm operating at, there is little chance I'll meet a good man. Not NO chance, but given that to my knowledge, my friends (many of whom are also single for no good reason) don't know any eligible men and that as I've gotten to the ripe ol' age of 32, the pace at which I meet anyone new, man or woman, has slowed down considerably, it's less than likely.


For the most part, I've just not cared all that much, except in the complainy way most of us like to complain about it. I've been sort of the opposite of desperate. I've occasionally done Match.com, or similar, but couldn't sustain the level of work necessary to sift out the winners because of my lack of caring. I've always told myself the serious lie everyone tells you which is "He'll come along. You'll meet that person when you least expect it." Um, no he won't. How? On Metro? I actually play a game on Metro that's called "Gay or married." I'll tell you, there are very few eligible straight men on Metro. In line at Starbucks? Sitting in my office working on spreadsheets? I guess there's always dating shows.   


Dating_Game_Kiss_-_June_26_1967 Anyway, I've realized I'm going to have to get a little bolder, put in a little more work, and engage in some serious dating combat. Sounds exhausting, huh? So, I am doing something I never tried before: a Craigslist ad. It's worked for me in the past in meeting very cool people for non-dating purposes, so I figure: why not datable men? No cost, other than time. My plan was inspired by my friend Elaina who met her current boyfriend this way. She planned to meet a new guy every week or every day or something like that. It worked, so I figured what the heck.


Since posting my ad a few hours ago, I've gotten 3 responses. One was looking for some casual sex with a jacuzzi tub soak afterwards (Uh, tempting, but no). Another was a guy who sent 1 line, something about liking the ad, with a picture of him shirtless (bad one, guys--don't do this. I think he was trying to detract from his face), and a 43-year-old, which is out of my age range (28-38--I typically like to stay with guys born in the 70s).  Fun group, eh? Anyway, the good thing about this is that I can easily delete these ones!


I'll be sure to keep everyone posted...


Super rad picture of The Dating Game Set on top from Tim's TV Showcase and the classic kiss shot from the  Burbank High School Class of 1967 blog.

Tuesday, July 8, 2008

Take a literary holiday with us...

Kennywood_1


When the sportscaster asks the literature Nobel prize laureate (as they tend to do), "So, you've won the Nobel Prize for Literature, what are you going to do now?" What does s/he answer? Can't say s/he's going to Disney World. Girl, please. That's why a bunch of bloggers are creating Word World. Well, that, and, frankly, doing other stuff is more boring.


The ever-creative Wende has devised this game, and each participant is designing her theme park based around one type of written word. Mine is going to be "Poetry Palisades." I'm running a bit behind, but the first task, in the tradition of Uncle Walt, is to name your market/audience. This is going to have to be a bit short because, ugh, I'm going to Richmond early tomorrow morning. (Can you think of a better way to spend a sticky day. I cannot.)


The core audience for Poetry Palisades is OBVIOUSLY cultured, but there are many distinct submarkets among them.


1.) More-Creative-than-Thou Trust Fund Babies. Though admittedly this is by its nature a limited market, the tendency of its members to have ample disposable income, the desperate need for something to do other than work, the desire to be constantly "finding themselves," and the belief that they are creative make them ripe for directed marketing efforts for Poetry Palisades. They will be especially apt to go to more "exclusive" areas with lots of booze and the potential for illicit drug use--and clubs/opportuities for them to spend their ancestors hard-earned cash should be planned.


2.) Soccer Moms Who Took That Class at the Community College/Local Arts Center. A more extensive market than number 1, these women have been or believe they have been repressed creatively. Therefore, they will seek opportunities to explore this side of themselves while their husbands are either a.) at a conference or b.) in the less "whimpy" areas of the park. Childcare should be planned for to accommodate this group and not add to their already overwhelming sense of inadequacy.


3.) Dudes Wanting to Impress Chicks. This needs no explanation. Guest write features in Maxim and Playboy assuring that poetry drives women wild and will get them into bed.


The following submarkets prove more difficult, due to ability to pay...but may be subsidized to provide an air of authenticity to the park.


3.) Melodramatic College English Majors/Creative Writing Students. They should be given separate "avenues" to explore in the park, given the fact that no one could possibly understand the "positively deep chasm" that is their soul. To breach the whole college students are poor thing, look into providing college credit and getting student aid funding.


4.) Published Poets. There are about five, so it shouldn't be hard. Could this be considered "research" and passed on to the publishing houses?


5.) Unpublished Poets. There are about 5 million of these, but still, it shouldn't be hard. Hang a few signs in some coffee shops and at Barnes and Noble. Potentially lure with promises of literary agents on the grounds looking for talent?


Stay tuned for the Park's signature ride and further developments...


Photo of old Kennywood Postcard from www.mckasd.com, the McKeesport Area School District site. They have a page devoted to rememberances of McKeesport, PA (God bless 'em...poor things. Better to remember than to actively live there...seriously, it's sad.)


 


 


 

Take a literary holiday with us...

Kennywood_1


When the sportscaster asks the literature Nobel prize laureate (as they tend to do), "So, you've won the Nobel Prize for Literature, what are you going to do now?" What does s/he answer? Can't say s/he's going to Disney World. Girl, please. That's why a bunch of bloggers are creating Word World. Well, that, and, frankly, doing other stuff is more boring.


The ever-creative Wende has devised this game, and each participant is designing her theme park based around one type of written word. Mine is going to be "Poetry Palisades." I'm running a bit behind, but the first task, in the tradition of Uncle Walt, is to name your market/audience. This is going to have to be a bit short because, ugh, I'm going to Richmond early tomorrow morning. (Can you think of a better way to spend a sticky day. I cannot.)


The core audience for Poetry Palisades is OBVIOUSLY cultured, but there are many distinct submarkets among them.


1.) More-Creative-than-Thou Trust Fund Babies. Though admittedly this is by its nature a limited market, the tendency of its members to have ample disposable income, the desperate need for something to do other than work, the desire to be constantly "finding themselves," and the belief that they are creative make them ripe for directed marketing efforts for Poetry Palisades. They will be especially apt to go to more "exclusive" areas with lots of booze and the potential for illicit drug use--and clubs/opportuities for them to spend their ancestors hard-earned cash should be planned.


2.) Soccer Moms Who Took That Class at the Community College/Local Arts Center. A more extensive market than number 1, these women have been or believe they have been repressed creatively. Therefore, they will seek opportunities to explore this side of themselves while their husbands are either a.) at a conference or b.) in the less "whimpy" areas of the park. Childcare should be planned for to accommodate this group and not add to their already overwhelming sense of inadequacy.


3.) Dudes Wanting to Impress Chicks. This needs no explanation. Guest write features in Maxim and Playboy assuring that poetry drives women wild and will get them into bed.


The following submarkets prove more difficult, due to ability to pay...but may be subsidized to provide an air of authenticity to the park.


3.) Melodramatic College English Majors/Creative Writing Students. They should be given separate "avenues" to explore in the park, given the fact that no one could possibly understand the "positively deep chasm" that is their soul. To breach the whole college students are poor thing, look into providing college credit and getting student aid funding.


4.) Published Poets. There are about five, so it shouldn't be hard. Could this be considered "research" and passed on to the publishing houses?


5.) Unpublished Poets. There are about 5 million of these, but still, it shouldn't be hard. Hang a few signs in some coffee shops and at Barnes and Noble. Potentially lure with promises of literary agents on the grounds looking for talent?


Stay tuned for the Park's signature ride and further developments...


Photo of old Kennywood Postcard from www.mckasd.com, the McKeesport Area School District site. They have a page devoted to rememberances of McKeesport, PA (God bless 'em...poor things. Better to remember than to actively live there...seriously, it's sad.)


 


 


 

I Hate What I'm Wearing

I went to the gym this morning, which meant I packed my clothes this morning to put on after my shower. And, I picked a sun dress I bought before my college reunion. Cute, great pattern, and I figured with the heat today it would be great. That was before I put it on. I swear the thing shrunk about 2 inches in the wash. Now, I'm going to be self-conscious all day, and it already has some self consciousness inducing elements to it, mostly due to the bareness of the upper area and a top built for the pre-reduction surgery Pamela Anderson (really--who ARE they making these for?). Because it's poofy, I can't tell where it's hitting on my backside. My strategy is to spend most of my time sitting, with the little cotton bolero buttoned up to cover what the Lane Bryant salesperson called my "sexy." "Sexy" and "Economic Analysis" do not go together. I'm going to the theatre tonight, and I plan to also use said sitting strategy there.  I briefly considered going to Filene's Basement or Talbot's to buy something else, but who has the time (or the extra dough to blow on something I don't really want anyway).


The dress in question, from Lane Bryant...


1639327  

I Hate What I'm Wearing

I went to the gym this morning, which meant I packed my clothes this morning to put on after my shower. And, I picked a sun dress I bought before my college reunion. Cute, great pattern, and I figured with the heat today it would be great. That was before I put it on. I swear the thing shrunk about 2 inches in the wash. Now, I'm going to be self-conscious all day, and it already has some self consciousness inducing elements to it, mostly due to the bareness of the upper area and a top built for the pre-reduction surgery Pamela Anderson (really--who ARE they making these for?). Because it's poofy, I can't tell where it's hitting on my backside. My strategy is to spend most of my time sitting, with the little cotton bolero buttoned up to cover what the Lane Bryant salesperson called my "sexy." "Sexy" and "Economic Analysis" do not go together. I'm going to the theatre tonight, and I plan to also use said sitting strategy there.  I briefly considered going to Filene's Basement or Talbot's to buy something else, but who has the time (or the extra dough to blow on something I don't really want anyway).


The dress in question, from Lane Bryant...


1639327  

Monday, July 7, 2008

Not that I am into playing into stereotypes...but...

Tourists


I'm proud to report that Americans are not the most despised tourists in the world...by hotel operators, at least! It's the French! Vive la France! (See the article from Time, via Yahoo, here). A snippet (emphasis mine):


"And it's not only the rest of the world that have a gripe with the Gallic attitude: the French also finished second to last among nations ranking the popularity of their own tourists who vacation at home...Will that move them to improve behavior the poll characterized as impolite, prone to loud carping and inattentive to local customs? If so, that's just the start: the study also describes the voyageur franÇais as often unwilling or unable to communicate in foreign languages, and particularly disinclined to spending money when they don't have to - including on those non compris tips. Over all, French travelers landed 19th out of 21 nations worldwide, far behind the first-place Japanese, considered most polite, quiet and tidy. Following the Japanese as most-liked tourists were the Germans, British and Canadians. Americans finished in 11th place alongside the Thais."


I am not anti-French, just anti American tourist bashing. American expats are particularly apt at complaining about how obnoxious American tourists are. Not because it's not true, necessarily--I've had my fair share of embarrasment for my countrypeople abroad--but because other countries have obnoxious travelers as well. I mean, have these people seen Germans? (And according to this article, they tip poorly).

Not that I am into playing into stereotypes...but...

Tourists


I'm proud to report that Americans are not the most despised tourists in the world...by hotel operators, at least! It's the French! Vive la France! (See the article from Time, via Yahoo, here). A snippet (emphasis mine):


"And it's not only the rest of the world that have a gripe with the Gallic attitude: the French also finished second to last among nations ranking the popularity of their own tourists who vacation at home...Will that move them to improve behavior the poll characterized as impolite, prone to loud carping and inattentive to local customs? If so, that's just the start: the study also describes the voyageur franÇais as often unwilling or unable to communicate in foreign languages, and particularly disinclined to spending money when they don't have to - including on those non compris tips. Over all, French travelers landed 19th out of 21 nations worldwide, far behind the first-place Japanese, considered most polite, quiet and tidy. Following the Japanese as most-liked tourists were the Germans, British and Canadians. Americans finished in 11th place alongside the Thais."


I am not anti-French, just anti American tourist bashing. American expats are particularly apt at complaining about how obnoxious American tourists are. Not because it's not true, necessarily--I've had my fair share of embarrasment for my countrypeople abroad--but because other countries have obnoxious travelers as well. I mean, have these people seen Germans? (And according to this article, they tip poorly).

Sunday, July 6, 2008

File in the Category of "Oh My Dear God."

Skin2_190


Easily one of the most ridiculous things I've read about. From the NYTimes via Decorno. A gym for "down there." In general, I think women spend way too much time thinking about how this area looks, and this is part of that. (Kegel exercises can be good for women with bladder control issues, but a GYM?)  I mean, really. My personal opinion is that if any man asked me to get a Brazilian, I'd say "Sure, honey, if you do first."  

Gratuitous Rug Closeup

P7060025

Sometimes Freedom Means...

freedom from a rug that's been annoying you for a long time. Mom visited this weekend and was the perfect enabler for my purchase of a new rug. It was serendipitous. One of my favorite Capitol Hill stores, Homebody, had several of their last stock Angela Adams rugs on sale. From what the proprietors said, Adams is going back to doing custom only orders, so they'll no longer be carrying them.  


This means I was able to finally find a replacement for the Crate & Barrel "arts and crafts"y style rug that has been with me for awhile. It served me well for many years, but suffered from too much moving of furniture around on it with many little snags. It also was too light and moved around a lot, and the tassles vexed me so, always going this way and that. It was time to say goodbye.


Before:


P9110172 


And after with my new Angela Adams "Kelly" rug:


P7060024


Okay, it also helps that I cleaned up the paper clutter on my table, but I still think it's amazing what a difference a simple change can make!

Sometimes Freedom Means...

freedom from a rug that's been annoying you for a long time. Mom visited this weekend and was the perfect enabler for my purchase of a new rug. It was serendipitous. One of my favorite Capitol Hill stores, Homebody, had several of their last stock Angela Adams rugs on sale. From what the proprietors said, Adams is going back to doing custom only orders, so they'll no longer be carrying them.  


This means I was able to finally find a replacement for the Crate & Barrel "arts and crafts"y style rug that has been with me for awhile. It served me well for many years, but suffered from too much moving of furniture around on it with many little snags. It also was too light and moved around a lot, and the tassles vexed me so, always going this way and that. It was time to say goodbye.


Before:


P9110172 


And after with my new Angela Adams "Kelly" rug:


P7060024


Okay, it also helps that I cleaned up the paper clutter on my table, but I still think it's amazing what a difference a simple change can make!

Happy Birthday America!

From the Capital's 4th of July Parade...


P7040214


P7040217


P7040225


And from the Folklife Festival...celebrating the cultures of Texas, NASA (don't know), and the kingdom of Bhutan.


P7040230


P7040229


P7040236



Happy Birthday America!

From the Capital's 4th of July Parade...


P7040214


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And from the Folklife Festival...celebrating the cultures of Texas, NASA (don't know), and the kingdom of Bhutan.


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